Samuel E. Hershey, “Mr. McCaskey” of Sports

So proud of our Sam Hershey, for all of his sports accolades he has received this year. He was named All-American for 2020 in soccer and more recently to the 2021 Big 33 football team as a kicker. Sam also plays on the McCaskey basketball team. He follows a history of sports standouts in the Hershey family.

https://lancasteronline.com/sports/mccaskey-soccer-standout-sam-hershey-named-all-american-for-2020-season/article_d09fc16e-3e66-11eb-ba49-8f4e7a1cdf1b.html

Trevor Hershey, Sam’s father played soccer at James Madison University and his mother, LindaLee (nee Papuga) scored the first ever goal in women’s soccer for Gettysburg University. Grandfather, Al, was an All-American soccer player for Elizabethtown College. All of them have coached on a collegiate level with Trevor and LindaLee at Millersville University. Al coached soccer at his Alma mater, Elizabethtown College and for 10 years at Franklin and Marshall College.

For those of you who do not know the Big 33, it is a team of high school seniors, chosen to represent Pennsylvania in a football game against Ohio or Maryland. Every Super Bowl has had at least one player who was on a Big 33 team.

Erin Spencer and Asha deVos National Geographic Special

According to the National Geographic website, cousin Erin Spencer will be featured on February 24, 2021 at 4:00 pm on YouTube. Below is copied of the information from the Nat Geo site. For more information about this program go to www.nationalgeographic.org to sign up. If you are a teacher, this is a great place to find educational programs to be used in your classroom.

“Asha de Vos is a Sri Lankan marine biologist, ocean educator, and blue whale expert. She founded the nonprofit Oceanswell to educate the next generation of ocean heroes and in 2019, Asha was named one of 12 Women Changemakers by the Parliament of Sri Lanka.

Erin Spencer is a marine ecologist and science communicator focusing on fisheries conservation and management. Her recent work has focused on the mislabeling of seafood in the United States and innovative responses to invasive species management.

Asha and Erin are together onboard the OceanXplorer with scientists and technologists from around the world. They’re currently offshore in the Bahamas, which is their first stop on a mission to explore the most unreachable parts of the ocean! Join them to hear behind-the-scenes stories from the frontlines of ocean exploration.” 

Isaac Long Barn Remembered

Cousin Bill McCord ran across a photo that belonged to Great Grandma Effie Long Bell and passed it along to me. The back of the photo reads “Isaac Long Barn of Landisville (it is really in Landis Valley), Lancaster Co., Penna. From this farm David Long came to Pfoutz’s Valley in 1812. My earliest known ancestor, Effie Long Bell.”

It is a wonderful picture of the Isaac Long Barn that is famous because it was at this farm that the first American born denomination was organized in 1766 -The Church of United Brethren in Christ Church. The farm is six miles northeast of Lancaster city.

Much has been written about this farm. The blue State Historical markers placed by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission dedicated the marker June 16, 1960. The text says”The United Brethren in Christ, and the Evangelical United Brethren Church trace their origin to the joint efforts of Rev. Philip W. Otterbein of the German Reformed Church and Martin Boehm, a Mennonite preacher, at a revival held here about 1767. The barn stands a mile and a half to the north off PA 272 (Oregon Pike) at Landis Valley Museum. ” (Ref. Beyer, George R., Guide to the State Historical Markers of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg: Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1991)

Although Effie Long Bell may not have known ancestors before David Long/Lang, William Gabriel Long in his book History of the Long Family of Pennsylvania with the help of the Long Family Organization, was able to take the Long/Lang family back a few more generations. David was the son of Abraham Lang and Maria, born in 1743 Manheim Township, Lancaster County, married Catherine Hershey. Aha, I’m descended from the Hersheys as well as being married to one. Abraham Long fought in the revolutionary war as did Catherine’s father, Abraham. Both of these ancestors have been proven, by me, for Daughters of the American Revolution. Just let me know if you want to join the Daughters or Sons of the American Revolution. I have all the paper work.

Abraham Long’s father was John and mother, Anna Long. The Long/Langs had lived in Lancaster County, PA until David moved to Perry County, PA. John was the son of emigrant, Christian Lang, who was said to be from the Palatinate Germany. I have not gone back any further, but it is on my list of research.

Eagle Scout Project at Gailey-White Cemetery

Prospective Eagle Scout, Jonathan Garula has chosen cleaning and restoring the Gailey-White cemetery as part of his project. He and his volunteers have replaced both bridges, removed a large tree, filled groundhog holes, righted and cleaned the stones.

Jonathan did this project this August and is now at college in Boston. We always need our mother’s help and his set up a “Go-Fund-Me” page that raised enough for the project and a donation to the scout troop. Thanks, Mom!

A big thank you to Jonathan and his volunteers for a job well done. Also, thank you to Henry Holman and his son for continuing to mow the walkway to the cemetery. They have kept the cemetery open for many years. Now is a good time to visit our ancestor’s graves.

Looking for Living Charles Family Members of Pennsylvania

I am working on a project for the Hiram Charles family of Lancaster County, PA and would like to hear from any members who are willing to provide a DNA sample for family research.  Depending on your family relationship, a DNA kit may be provided.

This project will use Autosomal DNA, so you won’t be excluded because of gender.  The results may be uploaded to GedMatch, but would not be identified with any of your information.

For further questions about this project, send an email through this website.

Thank you,

Deborah

George Eckert and Samuel Milliken/Milligan

On the hunt for more Revolutionary War ancestors after my visit to Yorktown, VA.  I have now submitted two more on the White side of the family.  They are George Eckert and Samuel Milliken/Milligan.  Now the wait is on for the year it will take before they are reviewed by NSDAR.  In the meantime,  I’m trying to find a woman in my ancestry that may have assisted in the Rev. War.  Always a feather in your cap if you have one of the ladies proven.

Yorktown is a wonderful place to visit.  They have an American Revolution of Yorktown Museum that is worth the trip.  They have an encampment that is very interesting.  This includes a kitchen, medical facility, supply hut and very knowledgeable staff.

Inside of the museum there are many artifacts and movies.  Both are helpful in following the war.  This is a State of Virginia museum.  Kudos to Virginia for such a wonderful asset.  The museum is designed with many areas that flow one into another and they seem to go on forever.  It is truly an amazing place to visit.

Yorktown Victory Monument

The battlefield at Yorktown is also very interesting.  Suggestion – don’t try to drive your motorhome around the battlefield.  We found a couple of areas we couldn’t access because of the bulk of this RV even though it is small by comparison to most.  We saw the redoubts taken by the Patriots, the digs that the soldiers did in the middle of the night to surprise the British, the National Cemetery,  the Yorktown Victory Monument, and lots of wildlife.

The Moore House is especially nice.  It is fully restored and historically is the home where the terms of agreement of surrender were worked out.  It is not the house where the British signed the agreement.  Still worth the visit if you like old homes.

First Families of Pennsylvania

I finally have time for my own research and have decided to work on First Families of Pennsylvania through the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania (GSP).  My initial family was Sarah Shoemaker who arrived in Philadelphia in 1686 and purchased 200 acres.  Her husband, George had died on the way over from Germany or before she had left so it was that she landed in Philadelphia with seven children.

From further research, we know that Sarah’s son, George married Sarah Wall, whose family was already here in 1682.  I will work on the Wall/Waln family for my supplement to First Families of PA.  There is an abundance written about the Wall’s, but I haven’t found EVERYTHING, so if you are researching the Shoemaker/Wall connection and have some records not available on line, I would love to have a copy.

The next families will be the Richardson and Levering families.  It is a challenge to get them listed in the oldest division of First Families –  Colony and Commonwealth: 1638–1790, but how fun to see how much information is available from that time period at GSP and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, both in Philadelphia.

Happy hunting to those who try.

Genealogy Has Lost a Treasure

I was sorry to receive a notice that a premier Pennsylvania German researcher has passed away. John T. Humphrey, author, researcher and friend died in Washington DC on August 12, 2012. I have no further details yet, but am really feeling the loss of this wonderful man. John was a prolific writer. Anyone who has researched in Pennsylvania has used his birth records books or his Pennsylvania Research: County and Township Records book. The most recent program where I heard John speak was at the National Genealogy Society meeting in Cincinnati in May. He was so knowledgeable about German research and a terrific speaker.

While talking with a friend from the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, she made the comment, “if you think of Pennsylvania German research, John was who you pictured”. I agree. He will be greatly missed.

The Countdown Continues – 13 days

Ladies and Gentlemen, only 13 days until the release of the 1940 United States Federal Census records.  There are many options to help index these records, so join up through the Associate of Professional Genealogists or FamilySearch or Ancestry.

If you are from Pennsylvania, this is a really big year.  The Bureau of Vital Statistics released birth records from 1906 and death records 1906-1961.  With this and the 1940 census, this could advance some of your research a few more generations.

And don’t forget to watch Who Do You Think You Are? this Friday at 8 pm.  Helen Hunt is the featured descendant.  This is a great show, but it isn’t as easy as it looks.  I’m always surprised when they bring out the really old southern records.  I thought they were all burned in the war.  It is mostly knowing where to look.

 

 

Death and Birth Records Now available for PA

The house bill has been passed to allow access to death records prior to 1961 and birth records prior to 1906.  This is wonderful, but we have yet to hear how, when or where they will be available.  The records are to go to the Pennsylvania Archives, but what does this mean?  Will they be on microfilm? On computer?  Will Ancestry.com or FamilySearch.org make them available on their websites?  How many birth records will be available since Pennsylvania only began officially recording them in 1906?

This is a lovely start, but we still have a long way to go to make me jump for joy.  We will still have to wait 5 months to receive a death certificate.